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returntothepit >> discuss >> April 20th 2017 Metal Thursday CCCXXVIII: Pink Mass (NJ Grind), Locus Mortis (NY Death Metal), Upheaval, & Death State @ Ralph's Worcester by KEVORD on Feb 19,2017 4:47pm
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: post by grandmotherweb at 2017-03-18 16:01:11
multiplicity is so common in incest survivors that Survivors of Incest Anonymous needs pamphlets for it. no one wants to see a bunch of goth'd-up religious freaks on their lawn, now, do they? quacktards.
http://siawso.flyingcart.com/index.php?p=detail&pid=22&cat_id=

http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/23/health/shyam...vie-dissociative-identity-disorder/

"According to Deckel, people who have been chronically abused, typically in situations with no viable escape, may "reconfigure the mind" into different parts or personalities.
Some of these parts can step in to handle traumatic or stressful situations, while other parts dissociate, or escape, from reality.

Since beginning therapy, she has been able to better control and agree on the switches with her alters. For Joubert and many others with DID, the goal of therapy is not always to "integrate" the different parts back into one,
but to learn to function and work together. "She has been able to use them very effectively," said her therapist, clinical psychologist Bilal Ghandour. "There's no reason to disrupt that system, as she calls it."
"It really is a survival or a coping mechanism," said Joubert, who does not plan to see "Split."

In contrast with McAvoy's character, Deckel said, people with DID, who may represent over 1% of Americans, are rarely violent. Research has shown that they are far more likely to hurt themselves than to hurt others.
But movies tend to portray only "the most extreme aspects" of the disorder, she said. This can misrepresent a form of mental illness that is not well understood by the lay public, and even some psychiatrists, she said."
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